Rugby: How to Make a Front Tackle
Tackler Makes Contact With the Shoulder and Wraps His Arms Around the Legs
Tackler Makes Contact With the Shoulder and Wraps His Arms Around the Legs

Rugby: How to Make a Front Tackle

Dick Moss, Editor, PE Update.com

Rugby differs from football in many ways—one of which is that players don't wear shoulder pads. As a result, a number of tackling techniques—including that of the front tackle—are different from North American football. For example, in the front tackle, the rugby tackler uses the ball carrier's own momentum to take him to the ground.

Tackler Falls Backwards, Turning
to Land On Top of the Runner
Tackler Falls Backwards, Turning to Land On Top of the Runner

Although experienced players with a weight advantage can attempt to drive the ball carrier backwards during a head-on confrontation, the following technique is more effective for beginners and smaller players.

Front Tackle Technique
As the ball carrier approaches, the tackler makes contact using the left or right shoulder (not the head). The tackler shrugs the shoulders on contact for a firmer tackling platform and for self-protection. Wrapping the arms around the ball carrier's legs, and driving upwards, the tackler allows himself to fall backwards while turning. The ball carrier's momentum will take him over the tackler's shoulder. At the same time, the tackler turns the ball carrier, so the tackler lands on top of the ball carrier when they contact the ground.

Using this technique, even your smallest players can tackle opposing mooses.

References:
1. Tony Biscombe & Peter Drewett, Rugby: Steps to Success, Human Kinetics Publishers, 1998.
2. Mathew Brown, Patrick Guthrie, Greg Growden, Rugby for Dummies, For Dummies; 3rd Edition, 2011.


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