Basketball: Rebound Angle Read Drill
Your Feeders Must Attempt to Stand on the Spot Where the Rebound Will Come Down
Your Feeders Must Attempt to Stand on the Spot Where the Rebound Will Come Down

Basketball: Rebound Angle Read Drill

Pat Aitken

Coaches often run drills in which players shoot from various positions around the key.  In these drills there's often a feeder, whose job is to catch the ball and pass it back.

Here's a way to enrich the role of your feeders. While running your regular shooting drills, you can also develop the feeders' ability to predict rebound angles, a critical rebounding ability.

Feeders' Drill
Whenever a shot is taken, the feeders should position themselves on the spot where they predict the ball will land.

If the feeder is able to rebound the ball without taking more than one step, they receive a point. The feeder with the most rebounds at the end of the drill wins.

Be sure to stress good technique: arms up, fingers spread to receive the ball, going up hard on each rebound. Also, be sure your players understand that normally they should go hard for every rebound—even if it's more than one step away.

References:
1. Jim Brandenburg, “Defensive
rebounding.” Editor, Jerry Krause, Coaching Basketball—The Official Centennial Volume of the National Assn. of Basketball Coaches, Masters Press, 1991.
2. Giorgio Gandolfi, The Complete Book of Offensive Basketball Drills: Game-Changing Drills from Around the World, McGraw Hill, 2009.


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